Best online Nursing Writing Service agency

Sample Capstone Project on Lord of the Rings with Education Perspective

Lord of the Rings with Education Perspective

Need Help Writing an Essay?

Tell us about your assignment and we will find the best writer for your paper.

Write My Essay For Me

Introduction

The Lord of the Rings is J. Tolkien’s’ trilogy of books that focus on the adventures of a Hobbit, Frodo. The story revolves around a ring which contains evil powers. Frodo and some of his friends and interested parties such as Gandalf decide to embark on a journey. Their aim is to return and destroy the ring considering that this is the only way through which lasting peace could be ensured in Middle Earth (Tolkien, 2003). Despite the prevalence of Frodo in the trilogy, there are other characters such as Sam and Gandalf, among others, whose roles are equally important.  The main objective of this paper is to assess the role The Lord of the Rings can play in developing humanity as a vehicle for inspiring and helping others in their struggles in life. The paper will draw insights from the philosophical, psychological and social perspectives.

The Lord of Rings with education from the psychological perspective

Education major is a field that requires among other factors the desire to impart knowledge on the students. Prior to the realization of this academic dream, there is need for a potential expert in the education sector to embrace courage as a virtue that is essential in realizing the objectives of the study. The Lord of the Rings is one of the books that exhibit the essence of courage in the realization of a vision and objective (Porter, 2005). It is possible to argue tha the hero in the Lord of the Rings is Frodo. This is because despite his size and lack of experience and information related to the Ring, he bore it to Mount Doom. It is possible to perceive Gandalf as the real hero in the trilogy considering the relevance of his wisdom and guidance in the entire journey to Mount Doom (Mathijs, 2006).

The trilogy, The Lord of the Rings, document numerous instances of courage among different characters. It is important for an individual in the education profession to understand the role of courage and bravery in addressing complex and challenging aspects of education sector. The education sector requires an individual who is willing to participate in a face to face relationship with different stakeholder (Charleson, 2013). These include public speaking, and participating in focus group discussions. The success of these discussions will be dependent on the ability of an individual to embrace bravery in facing and handling crowds. Different individuals in The Lord of the Rings trilogy displayed varied levels of courage with the objective of realizing a goal of their journey to Mount Doom (Mathijs, 2006).

Self-esteem is also another aspect that is addressed in The Lord of the Rings. Sam and Frodo are two characters in the trilogy who through the realization that they play an essential role in the journey to destroy the ring (Chance, 2001). In the process of traveling to Mount Doom, Frodo realized the challenges that the Nazgul could pose. In addition, during the meeting at the Council of Elrond, Frodo realizes that his responsibility to the group and volunteers to take to ring to Mordor (Porter, 2005). This could only be achieved if Frodo together with his friend Sam had very high self-esteem (Mathijs, 2006). When this is understood from the perspective of the education sector, educating majors must understand that for any initiative to occur in any field they must take responsibility for every action. It will therefore require that they understand the situation, the prevailing challenges and the possibility of developing effective solutions to the problem (Liyanage, 2006).

The initial responsibility of any leader is to ensure that he is courageous enough to make decisions on that which he or she believes to be true and right. Such a decision is only possible when there is evidence that failure to take action may lead to undesirable and unfriendly consequences (Charleson, 2013). The possession of high self-esteem is often an indication tha an individual, as in the case of Frodo is a risk taker. The education sector requires risk takers to initiate project that will revise the entire curriculum and introduce initiatives aimed at improving the ability of student and other stakeholders to engage in practical education (Liyanage, 2006). Frodo was a hero in The Lord of the Rings not because he was in possession of the ring, but because he was determined and believed that they could succeed in taking the ring back to Mordor and ensure that it is completely destroyed (Porter, 2005). This was aimed at delivering the Middle Earth from the endeavors of the Black riders and the King of Mordor.

Self-esteem also encompasses the belief that one can achieve what is perceived to be impossible. The impossibility of realizing a dream is often based on the impending setbacks. This calls for visioning as a technique of foreseeing the future and the impending challenges if an individual fails to take action (Liyanage, 2006). The vision of a better future can be considered as the driving force towards Gandalf and Frodo’s journey to Mordor. It is often important for individuals to perceive themselves as able to accomplish goals that seem complicated or relatively difficult to realize. This will not only generate some form of determination but introduce a tendency of goal setting (Isaacs & Zimbardo, 2005).

Hope is an essential psychological aspect in every endeavor. For any plan to succeeded, those participating in every process must be hopeful tha the project will come to an end with the accomplishment of the intended results (Charleson, 2013). This is only realizable when there is belief in the leadership and belief in the course. The Lord of the Rings provides a perfect example of the essence of hope in complex and challenging projects. In his writings, Tolkien presents heavy moments where those perceived to be good suffer while others give in situations whenever unbearable situations are witnessed (Skogemann, 2009). Despite this revelation, Tolkien provides evidence that there are also who believe in second chances and an opportunity to rise from destruction and disappointments. Boromir, for example betrays his friends but at the end of the book he is redeemed (Tolkien, 2003). His companions still find reasons to forgive him. In the life, hope is in itself an attribute that every stakeholder must embrace to be able to accomplish any objective (Isaacs & Zimbardo, 2005).

Students are considerd as the most complicated yet an essential component in education   sector. This means that there are situations where these children may demonstrate different instances of let downs and disappointment. However, the facilitator or the instructor has the responsibility of keeping hope alive especially if these situations are related to failure in examinations (Liyanage, 2006). The ability to reveal concern in the wellbeing of a student is an indication that they can improve in their areas of weakness. Through hope a student is also able to find reason to embrace hard work in every educational endeavor. In addition, the ability of the facilitator to show concern is also reflected in the development of workable initiatives towards the provision of lasting solutions (Charleson, 2013). Sharing problems and finding solutions is not only a preserve of the teaching fraternity but is also a parenting role. Through the interactions between different stakeholders in the education sector it will be easier for teachers to develop an all-inclusive strategy for realizing goals. This is however realizable when there is unity of purpose and the hope in achieving set objectives (Charleson, 2013).

The Lord of Rings with education from the social perspective

Tolkien in his trilogy, The Lord of the Rings reveals the essence of psychosocial support. This is as depicted in numerous instances where the fear of Nazgul and the King of Mordor threatened the possibility of succeeding in the journey to Mordor (Porter, 2005). The presence of Gandalf and Sam provided Frodo with an assurance that there were always individual ready to ensure success throughout the journey (Chance, 2001). The education profession is an entity that is often characterized by challenges and disappointment from different sectors, this means that for any form of progress to be realized it will be important for the instructors within the sector to be enrolled in a program which provides some form of motivation and solutions to problems. Through such programs, the stakeholder will be guaranteed of unending support from different platforms (Liyanage, 2006).

Teamwork is an essential aspects in matters related to realization of a common objective. This is because the decision making process is often consultative enough to ensure that the eventual decision is the best out of the possible alternatives (Beaumont, 2009). Team work is also considered to be a sign and a source of unity throughout the process of executing different responsibilities. Unity is an indication that a group is working towards a common goal and increases the possibility of succeeding throughout the process. In The Lord of the Rings, the team that was formed to accompany Frodo to Mordor was composed of individuals from different regions within Middle Earth. These individual were concerned of the welfare of their surrounding and the threat presented by the King of Mordor and the Nazgul (Porter, 2005). This can be said to be a team since they were driven by a common agenda.

In the education sector, teamwork is an essential ingredient since it defines the ability of individuals derived from different sectors to work towards the realization of a common goal. This can only be considered a possibility when the said individual recognizes the existence of a problem and is willing to engage in a deliberate effort to develop solutions for the said problem (Liyanage, 2006). Being a voluntary and deliberate effort every individual that forms part of the team such as the parents, teachers and students are expected to play their part to ensure the realization of the common goal. Failure of a group can be perceived in situations where team members betray others as in the case of Boromir in The Lord of the Rings (Bassham & Bronson, 2003). Through team work it will be possible for those in the education sector to realize the sense of helping in relieving other team members of their burden. This will be based on the understanding that the ability of other team members to show support especially in times of need. Sam, Frodo’s best friend, in The Lord of the Rings understood the predicaments that Frodo was undergoing hence his decision to be an active member of Frodo’s team in every situation (Isaacs & Zimbardo, 2005).

The development of different aspect of humanity revolves around the ability to exercise some form of moderation of power. This is often based on the realization that unruly personalities will often have the desire of using power to acquire their desires. Tolkien in The Lord of the Rings portrays the King of Mordor as power hungry personality (Shippey, 2011). This was as witnessed in his desires to gain control over Middle Earth by amassing all the power and developing strategies with all those who were willing to make him the overall ruler. Those who were against the endeavors of the King of Mordor were considerd enemies of the Middle Earth and this explains why Frodo and his team were in constant conflict with Nazgul, the Black riders of Mordor (Skogemann, 2009).

The development of humanity in the 21st century can only be realized through moderation of the elements of power. The education sector plays the role of developing different perceptions concerning the role of the powerful and the less powerful in the development of the society (Liyanage, 2006). By understanding these roles it will be possible to embrace tolerance at every level of interaction. It will also be possible to develop techniques through which different sectors in the society can be developed for the realization of the welfare of every member. The education sector must therefore provide an insight on how to develop a relatively equal society. The ability to moderate power can therefore be perceived as the desire to embrace humility.  In every society, especially on matters related to government in the 21st century, there are always structures of limiting power. The presidency is often limited in terms of the years that an individual can vie and be elected for the post. This is often to minimize the possibility channeling power on one individual since it can corrupt no matter how humble the individual is presumed to be (Charleson, 2013).

Learning the value of trusting other members of the society is an essential attribute in human development in the 21st century. For any individual to have the ability to progress in terms of realizing his intended objective there is an element of trust that he must embrace. This is largely because it is not possible to exist and execute all responsibilities from an individual perspective.  Inasmuch as it is important to learn to trust one another, every individual must also learn to trust themselves especially on matters related to making life decisions. In many occasions in The Lord of the Rings, the trilogy reveals an outstanding level of trust between individuals whose objective is to destroy what they perceive as evil (Shippey, 2011).

In the process of socializing and developing trust and different bonds with people, there is a possibility of such people being involved in betrayals. This often leads to loss of hope and determination. In other situations it leads to the development of self-doubt concerning how to trust and those to trust (Charleson, 2013). These are situations of dilemma and it requires an individual to use his experience and knowledge in choosing that which is best for the individual and that which is best for the team. Irrespective of the choice, it would be important to ensure that the decision made realizes objectives in life (Bassham & Bronson, 2003).

An important life lesson that can be drawn from The Lord of the Rings is an aspect of sacrifice. This is based on the understanding that for an objective to be realized individual have the responsibility of ensuring that they give up that which they perceive as important to them. This is often geared towards the realization of the group’s objectives. The period in which The Lord of the Rings was written was characterized by wars and the reign of the Nazi regime (Chance, 2001). Tolkien developed these books based on the understanding that victory could only be realized at a definite cost. The theme of sacrifice is therefore an essential part of these novels and in major characters such as Frodo (Chance, 2001). For the team to ensure t a complete destruction of Mordor and Nazgul, Frodo has to give up his peaceful life with the knowledge that he could die in the course of the journey (Skogemann, 2009). Frodo has given up everything to protect the Middle Earth and at the end of the journey he had no place in it (Isaacs & Zimbardo, 2005). The 21st century is currently facing numerous complications that can only be solved through the sacrifice of individual comfort for the benefit of the world.

In the current society there are numerous economic, scientific and social challenges which include the effects of climate change and global warming. The education fraternity has the responsibility of ensuring that there is sufficient awareness making different members of the world concerning the danger of depleting the ozone layer. An informed population will most likely take effective measures in the development of strategies aimed at finding lasting solutions to the challenge of climate change and global warming. In addition, through the education sector it is also possible to document progress that different entities have made in the process of realizing a safe environment.

Socially, it is also the responsibility of the population to recognize the essence of environmental conservation for the sake of the future generations. Tolkien expresses his concern on matters of the environment. The Ents for instance are representing a devastated environment whose concerns are based on the less attention that man provides towards ensuring their sustainability (Skogemann, 2009). The environment through the trees, expresses its outrage on the human population. The broader aspect that is understood from this perspective is derived from the understanding that human beings have the responsibility of protecting that which is beneficial to their livelihoods since relentless and careless destruction of entities such as tress often affect the overall wellbeing of the human population.

In every society there is need to embrace different aspects of hospitality. This is often meant to rescue strangers from impending danger. In The Lord of the Rings, Elves are recognized as an outstanding group of people. This is due to their desire to always welcome strangers and provide them with platforms on how to satisfy their needs (Shippey, 2011). This is also used to explain why they are perceived as part of the successful population sin the Middle Earth. Providing ways through which the vulnerable can find the much needed help is considered as an aspect that defines success from the human perspective. (Skogemann, 2009) It is therefore important to embrace different members of the population. this not only shows a signs of acceptance but it can also be perceived as an intention to develop a society free from all forms of discrimination. The education sector has an essential role to play in creating awareness on the best possible ways through which different members of the society can embrace and practice hospitality. Hospitality just as other values and virtues such as generosity and kindness are often developed through constant engagement with different members of the society.  

 

 

The Lord of Rings with education from the philosophical perspective

Objective thought is often the main goal of a philosophical approach to any discourse. The Lord of the Rings provides a different and understanding on the perception that individuals should develop towards life. From the trilogy, it is possible to note that Tolkien emphasizes on the depth rather than the length of life (Isaacs & Zimbardo, 2005). The realization that death in inevitable should be the driving force for the population in the 21st century. The relationship between Arwen and Aragon is based on the realization that they will one day die. They have the responsibility of cherishing this relationship to make every time count for all those that are involved (Skogemann, 2009).

Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings presents numerous instances of the relationship between power, morality and personal choice. The story of the powerful ring and the desire of Frodo to destroy it can be viewed as a 21st century representation of a problem of ethical thinking which was originally propounded by Plato, an ancient philosopher. The main concern for Plato in his classic dialogue, The Republic, was the relationship between power and morality. He recounts a story about Gyges, who is in possession of a ring with magical powers. Gyges uses the power of the ring to make the wearer invisible to access the palace, assassinate the king and seduce the queen (Gersh, 2002). The question that Plato raises from the story revolves around the ability of an individual to practice morality even when he has the powers to practice wickedness with impunity. This is an indication that immense power has the ability to destroy the desire to be a moral person (Reeves, 2004).

It is possible to perceive Tolkien’s tales concerning the ring of the King of Mordor as a variation of Plato’s problem of morality and personal choice. It is possible to compare Sauron’s one ring with the ring of Gyges considering its ability to give its possessor the powers to act beyond that which is perceived as normal (Reeves, 2004). The possessor of the ring develops selfish interests and hopes that most of his desires can be satisfied. This happens while neglecting the concerns and the needs of others in the surrounding. The story of Sauron and the ring as depicted by Tolkien is a revelation that the idea of absolute power cannot be perceived to co-exist with morality (Isaacs & Zimbardo, 2005). The rings that Frodo and Sauron possess, at different stages in the trilogy are representations of absolute powers which are in conflict with any form of behavior that has the objective of respecting the desires and the needs of other members of the society (Purtill, 2003). It is important for individuals in the society to consider the positions that they hold and how the power that is generated from these positions affect their relationships with other members of the society (Gersh, 2002).

A moral and philosophical lesson that can be derived from Tolkien’s main character, Frodo, is in the way to use or not to use the ring is a matter of personal decision. An individual with the capacity to employ logical and moral assumptions does not have to follow the example of Plato’s Gyges since all human beings have the ability to reject the uncontrolled use of the ring of power (Reeves, 2004). Other than Frodo there are characters in The Lord of the Rings who demonstrate different reactions to the possibility of being in possession of vast power. Gollum for instance is completely destroyed by his selfish interests for the ring. Boromir is led to betray his team members by his desires to possess unlimited power for the good of Middle Earth (Skogemann, 2009). There are those such as Galadier, whose understanding of the powers of the ring leads them to reject its use in every capacity. In the contemporary society there are different individual with different interest and abilities (Purtill, 2003). It is important for every individual to understand their strengths and weaknesses as a technique of minimizing the possibility of temptation while in possession of absolute powers. It is also an indication that there are several ways on how individual react to situation in the community. This understanding should define allocation of responsibilities in any society (Gersh, 2002).

The development of an effective understanding of Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings presents numerous connotations and questions concerning personal choice, morality and power (Bassham & Bronson, 2003). This is in relation of the possibility that a person will choose to be lead a virtuous life while renouncing the possession of immense power. The only way through which this level of morality can be realized is through embracing power with love and friendship (Beaumont, 2009).

Personal decisions on whether to embrace power of a virtuous life are often the basis of any moral philosophical discourse.  The nature of an individual’s soul is often an important determinant in differentiating between hazards and benefits (Reeves, 2005). In Tolkien’s trilogy, Galadriel, Sam and Bombadil completely reject any form of association with the ring (Shippey, 2011). This helps them to remain uncorrupted by its ability to seduce. Their strength emanates from their level of individual understanding (Purtill, 2003). These characters are aware of their limits. To be moral is to understand ones personality. It is therefore important for any individual to choose a life that is in accordance with his abilities (Skogemann, 2009).

The desire to lead a good life often propels any form of power wilding initiative. Assuming control over other people in the society was the objective of the King of Mordor. This he could only realize using the ring that Frodo was destined to destroy (Skogemann, 2009). Frodo is an outstanding personality in the trilogy considering his ability to minimize personal desires for the goodness of Gondor (Tolkien, 2003). Despite being overwhelmed by the power of the ring, he often rose from the effects and took on the journey towards Mordor (Shippey, 2011).

Conclusion

The Lord of the Rings is J. Tolkien’s’ trilogy of books that focus on the expeditions of a Hobbit, Frodo. The story revolves around a ring which contains evil powers. Frodo and some of his friends and interested parties such as Gandalf decide to embark on a journey. Throughout the expedition characters embody high self esteem as an important life lesson. This is because self-esteem also encompasses the belief that one can achieve what is perceived to be impossible. The impossibility of realizing a dream is often based on the impending setbacks. This calls for visioning as a technique of foreseeing the future and the impending challenges if an individual fails to take action, the ability to exercise moderation power and the desire to always do good for the society is also revealed as an essential attribute that rational and successful individuals must possess.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

Bassham, G., & Bronson, E. (2003). The Lord of the rings and philosophy: One book to rule

them all.

Beaumont, D. M. (2009). The message behind the movie: How to engage with a film without

disengaging your faith. Chicago, Ill: Moody Publishers.

Chance, J. (2001). The lord of the rings: The mythology of power. Lexington: University Press of

Kentucky.

Charleson, J. A. (2013). Experience personal fulfillment and achieve your life’s destiny. S.l.:

Liferich.

Gersh, S. (2002). The platonic tradition in the Middle Ages: A doxographic approach. Berlin

[u.a.: de Gruyter.

Isaacs, N. D., & Zimbardo, R. A. (2005). Understanding The lord of the rings: The best of

Tolkien criticism. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Liyanage, S. (2006). Serendipitous and Strategic Innovation: A Systems Approach to Managing

Science-based Innovation. Westport, Conn: Praeger.

Mathijs, E. (2006). Lord of the Rings: Popular culture in global context. London [u.a.:

Wallflower Press.

Porter, L. R. (2005). Unsung heroes of the Lord of the rings: From the page to the screen.

Westport, Conn: Praeger.

Purtill, R. L. (2003). J. R. R. Tolkien: Myth, morality, and religion. San Francisco, Calif: Ignatius

Press.

Reeves, M. F. (2004). Platonic engagements: A contemporary dialogue on morality, justice and

the business world. Dallas: University Press of America.

Shippey, T. A. (2011). J.R.R. Tolkien: Author of the century. Glasgow: HarperCollins Publishers.

Skogemann, P. (2009). Where the shadows lie: A Jungian interpretation of Tolkien’s The lord of

the rings. Wilmette, Ill: Chiron Publications.

Tolkien, J. R. R. (2003). The lord of the rings. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annotated Bibliography

Bassham, G., & Bronson, E. (2003). The Lord of the rings and philosophy: One book to rule

them all.

The book tries to relate the possibility of wielding power for the good and the corrupt. This according to the book is the main question in The Lord of the Rings. In its analysis, the book recognizes that The Lord of the Rings is divided into five sections in which Tolkien attempts to answer questions related to power and the ring. The desire for happiness, good and evil in Gondor, the essence of time and morality, and the importance of fairy tales are the sections that this book attempts to explore.

Beaumont, D. M. (2009). The message behind the movie: How to engage with a film without

disengaging your faith. Chicago, Ill: Moody Publishers.

The book emphasizes on the essence of using philosophical, sociological and psychological approach to issues without interfering with the religious perceptive of the audience. Through such an approach, it is possible for individuals to draw life lessons from a books and films of The Lord of the Rings. In addition, the book emphasizes on the role of literature and the film industry in providing life lessons such as courage, self-esteem and tolerance to the audience. This is the most important work of any literature or film.

 

 

Chance, J. (2001). The lord of the rings: The mythology of power. Lexington: University Press of

Kentucky.

This book places The Lord of the Rings into its context. The book was written and published in the years of Nazi regime in Germany. While critiquing the incompetent and intolerant rule of the Nazi through Hitler, the book reveals the dynamic and mythologies of power. This is based on the realization that even the most insignificant individual has a role to play in the delivery of the modem world from unruly leaders. In addition, the book also focuses on the essence of teamwork, trust and association between individual of similar minds in realizing an objective

Charleson, J. A. (2013). Experience personal fulfillment and achieve your life’s destiny. S.l.:

Liferich.

The author of this book reveals essential lessons in the connection between nature, personality and the desire to realize a future of personal fulfillment. The ability of an individual to understand and embrace these connections is a way through which he can express his unique strengths, emotional, intellectual and spiritual brilliance. Those who fail to realize these benefits are often deviant and should not be allowed to take positions of leadership since they are lacking in essential tenets.

Gersh, S. (2002). The platonic tradition in the Middle Ages: A doxographic approach. Berlin

[u.a.: de Gruyter.

This book delineates the essence of an intellectual tradition in any society. The society has the responsibility of grooming individual to become responsible citizens in the future. This is however only realizable when the said individual can be understood in terms of the innate force driving their actions. The author argues that the platonic perspective of the division in a society is essential determinants in differentiating the soldiers, from the leaders. This is the only way through which those driven by rationality can assume positions of leadership.

Isaacs, N. D., & Zimbardo, R. A. (2005). Understanding The lord of the rings: The best of

Tolkien criticism. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Isaacs and Zimbardo provide an analytical look at The Lord of the Rings. This is through the analysis of different characters within the trilogy and the roles they play in motivating the reader towards the realization of desired goals and objectives. This book is essential to the paper considering that lays emphasis on personal values an in the decision making process. This is realized through the depiction of different scenarios in the trilogy and the way through which the characters used their values and personalities in generation solutions.

Liyanage, S. (2006). Serendipitous and Strategic Innovation: A Systems Approach to Managing

Science-based Innovation. Westport, Conn: Praeger.

The author of the book while basing his assumptions on science argues that it is important for any society to engage its population in innovative activities. This in the view of the author, Liyanage, is the only way through which any society can develop a generation that is inspired to be creative and possess the attitude of believing in themselves. In addition, this is also a way through which essential virtues of courage, patience and hard work can be developed among members of the society. The essence of this book to this paper is that it provides an insight on how to the psychological comfort of a population can be realized.

Mathijs, E. (2006). Lord of the Rings: Popular culture in global context. London [u.a.:

Wallflower Press.

The author reveals the role that the trilogy The Lord of the Rings has been playing since it gained popularity in the 1960s. The author, Mathijs, argues that the book inspires its audience and readers into understanding the underlying issues that define life. Self-sacrifice, patience and determination are part of the life lessons that the book views as being advocated for by Tolkien. The absence of these virtues is an indication of the collapse of any hopes or aspirations in life.

Porter, L. R. (2005). Unsung heroes of the Lord of the rings: From the page to the screen.

Westport, Conn: Praeger.

Porter identifies that most of the reviews of The Lord of the Rings focus on the major characters but neglect other characters such as Boromir who played an essential role in unraveling the story. The book emphasizes on the role of every character in making up the roles of the main characters. This book is relevant to this paper since it lays emphasis on the essence of those considered as insignificant. Porter argues to a possible extent even Frodo is considered to be insignificant since he does not possess the powers and might such as those of Gandalf and Aragon but he is the one to lead the quest to Mordor.

Purtill, R. L. (2003). J. R. R. Tolkien: Myth, morality, and religion. San Francisco, Calif: Ignatius

Press.

The book provides an in-depth look at the role of myth, morality and religion in the works of Tolkien. The book asserts the role that Tolkien plays in assessing the importance of morality in making life decisions. In addition, through this book Purtil identifies the extraordinary ability of Tolkien to touch the lives of his readers by revealing the most essential aspects that one must consider in the process of ensuring that he leads a virtuous life.

Reeves, M. F. (2004). Platonic engagements: A contemporary dialogue on morality, justice and

the business world. Dallas: University Press of America.

This book raises question concerning platonic understanding of different aspects of morality and personal choice. The ability of an individual to understands the dynamics and the nature of power often influence his ability to make decisions. In this book the platonic assumption is that it is only those individual who are driven by the desire for societal good that should be allowed to take up positions of power. This is the only thorough which the society can progress.  Handing power to selfish individuals leads to tyrannical leadership and the evolution of a morally corrupt society.

Shippey, T. A. (2011). J.R.R. Tolkien: Author of the century. Glasgow: HarperCollins Publishers.

This book provides a critical look at The Lord of the Rings with much concentration on the philosophical lessons derived from the writings. In addition, the book compares his works with those of Plato concerning Gyges and his inability to regulate his personal interests when in possession of a ring with evil powers. The question of morality, the relevance of evil and the essence of personal choices in the decision making process, form major parts of this book.

Skogemann, P. (2009). Where the shadows lie: A Jungian interpretation of Tolkien’s The lord of

the rings. Wilmette, Ill: Chiron Publications.

This book takes the audience and readers on a journey through Tolkien’s Middle-earth, following Frodo and his companions including the challenges they face in their quest. The book also discloses the deep symbolic assertions that are the source of happiness and disappointments while reading The Lord of the Rings. Aragorn, with assistance from Gandalf, Legoli, and Gimli, takes over the throne to create unified kingdom–a symbol of the collective Self. The four hobbits are altered by the expedition and gain the psychological tools necessary in renewing the Shire–the small domain enfolded in the great. Through numerous life lessons the book provides a platform for understanding ourselves and the events of the outside world in the contemporary society.

Tolkien, J. R. R. (2003). The lord of the rings. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Tolkien presents and epic depiction of the great war between the King of Mordor and the rest of the people in Middle Earth. The war can only be won by those in possession of the Ring of Mordor. Frodo and his friends, begin an expedition towards Mordor to destroy the ring. This is because it is the only way to deny the King of Mordor the powers to rule over the Middle earth. The expedition is however, characterized by a series of challenges from those interested in the Ring. At the end Frodo succeeds in destroying the rings and bringing with it lasting peace in the Middle earth.

The post Sample Capstone Project on Lord of the Rings with Education Perspective appeared first on Essay Homework Writing Help.

Our writing company helps you enjoy campus life. We have committed and experienced tutors and academic writers who have a keen eye in writing papers related to Business, Management, Marketing, History, English, Media studies, Literature, nursing, Finance, Medicine, Archaeology, Accounting, Statistics, Technology, Arts, Religion, Economics, Law, Psychology, Biology, Philosophy, Sociology, Political science, Mathematics, Engineering, Ecology etc

Get Assignment Writing Help from Qualified Writers at Student-Friendly Prices. NO PLAGIARISM Guarantee!

NEED ESSAY WRITING HELP?

-Plagiarism free

-Timely delivery

Share your love